SOMD Reports: Third Delegate Refused to Show Up for SSM Vote in Maryland


Delegate Curtis Anderson (D-Baltimore, pictured right) also failed to show up for the committee vote today. He has served as the chairman of the Maryland Legislative Black Caucus, according to his website.

Del. Jill Carter is unapologetic about holding out for a payoff:

"I don't feel good about disappointing my colleagues, but I think that has to be secondary to my obligation to do as much as I can (for my constituents)," said Carter, who argued that funding for schools and other issues should get as much priority as same-sex marriage.

Everyone is shocked as more Democrat delegates jump from "yes" to "undecided" or "absent," according to this news report from Southern Maryland Online, as a result of a flood of phone calls from constituents (like you!):

"The committee attempted to hold an unscheduled vote after Tuesday morning's general session, but three co-sponsors, Delegates Tiffany Alston, D-Prince George's, Jill Carter, D-Baltimore, and Curtis Anderson, D-Baltimore, were absent. Chairman Joseph Vallario (D-Calvert, P.G.) rescheduled the vote until after the committee's afternoon schedule.

Around 6 p.m., after five hours of testimony on unrelated bills, and long stretches of time where he was not in the hearing room, Vallario again postponed the vote, arguing that not all delegates were present and that it was too late to call the vote.

"The hour is late, there are delegates missing on this side and that side ... we might vote tomorrow, but I don't know," Vallario said.

Tuesday morning's absences came as a surprise to the bill's sponsors and speaks to the internal struggle going on among delegates who are wavering over their stance on same-sex marriage, said Delegate Bonnie Cullison, D-Montgomery.

Up until the end of last week, passage of the bill in the House seemed likely, but as of Tuesday, several delegates were still on the fence.

"Since the Senate has passed the same-sex marriage bill, many delegates are struggling with their votes, now that they have to push a button," Cullison said."