NOM BLOG

Oregon Judge Faces Charges for Declining to Perform Same-sex ‘Wedding’ Ceremonies

 

There is a movement to attack and discharge all officials in the United States who refuse to violate their religious beliefs in order to instigate the erroneous Supreme Court ruling on marriage. As we saw with Kim Davis, the same-sex marriage agenda does not want tolerance or peaceful coexistence; they want to be able to control all societal aspects, from prosaic terminology to religious beliefs.

However, there are still those like Kim Davis who stand firm in the face of adversary and defend marriage. One such example is transpiring in Oregon. The Daily Signal has the story:

ThinkstockPhotos-56519054An Oregon judge is fighting an investigative panel’s accusation that by declining to perform same-sex weddings on religious grounds, he violated both the state’s constitution and code of conduct for judges.

This and other allegations could result in the judge’s suspension or removal from office.

However, a close friend of two decades told The Daily Signal that the charges are “hogwash.”

Vance D. Day, one of 14 judges on the Marion County Circuit Court in Salem, Ore., readily admits that he asked an assistant not to schedule him for same-sex marriages but instead to arrange for another judge to officiate.

Performing the marriage of two men or two women “conflicted with his firmly held religious beliefs,” Day told the Oregon Commission on Judicial Fitness and Disability.

Those beliefs, Day said in papers responding to the commission’s complaint, are “rooted in the Judeo-Christian tradition that defines marriage as between a female and a male.”

. . .

In allegations to be aired in a public hearing Nov. 9, the judicial panel says Day “inappropriately screened and ordered his court staff to screen wedding applicants to ensure they were not same-sex applicants, because [he] refused to marry same-sex partners even though they could lawfully marry under Oregon law.”

A federal judge’s ruling legalized same-sex marriage in Oregon in May 2014, more than a year before a 5-4 decision by the Supreme Court legalized it across the land.

Day admits arranging for staff to connect same-sex couples with another judge, spokesman Patrick Korten said, adding that Day decided to stop officiating at all marriages about a year ago.

“It suggests the length to which those who favor same-sex marriage are willing to go to coerce people not merely to accept it, but embrace it,” Korten, a former Reagan administration official hired by Day, told The Daily Signal about the allegations against the judge.

“We’re trying to make sure the public understands what the charges are, how weak they are, and what the judge’s response is,” he said.