NOM BLOG

In Our Wildest Dreams, We Yearn for Masculine & Feminine Love

 

Robert Oscar Lopez was raised by two lesbians and has since become an outspoken advocate for the rights of children to be loved by both a mother and a father. He not only opposes same-sex ‘marriage’ but he has become a leading spokesperson against surrogacy, which he believes amounts to trafficking in women, treating them as a commodity in order to fulfill the market demands of gay men who wish to father children. He writes provocatively about our natural yearning for masculine and feminine love – the love of a father and a mother – and uses the popularity of Taylor Swift’s new music video “Wildest Dreams” as a device to make the point.

Swift casts herself in the video as a woman from the 1940s, vaguely reminiscent of a Lauren Bacall, who projects traditional beauty and femininity. Dr. Lopez writes, “We have had enough. By “we” I mean everyone on Earth. We are sick of hearing about men who don’t love women, women who hate men, women who use men, men who use women, women who want babies without being impregnated by a man, men who want babies without impregnating a woman, men who want to be women, women who want to be men…We want John and Abigail Adams—a man and woman to change the world by truly working together and siring children through love, then raising and educating them. We can’t get back to the eighteenth century, so the closest we have is the late 1940s. Ergo, Taylor Swift’s wildest dreams.”

The Federalist has the piece:

Image Via Cleveland.com/TaylorSwiftVEVO/YouTube

Image via Cleveland.com/TaylorSwiftVEVO/YouTube

In light of all the debates about transgenderism, gay marriage, abortion, “war on women” memes, third-party reproduction, and whether it’s okay to call Rosie O’Donnell a fat slob, allow me to hazard a guess as to why Swift seems to be emerging as the true voice of the next generation (pace Lena Dunham).

It’s not just Kim Davis. We have had enough. By “we” I mean everyone on Earth. We are sick of hearing about men who don’t love women, women who hate men, women who use men, men who use women, women who want babies without being impregnated by a man, men who want babies without impregnating a woman, men who want to be women, women who want to be men, women who want to kill the babies they conceived with men, and men who want women to kill their babies and sell them to man-hating abortion conglomerates who then resell them to organ-trafficking firms headed by lesbians who then resell them to universities that spend lavish federal funding on women’s studies and gender-studies programs that fill millions of college students with more of these self-destructive absurd theories about manhood and womanhood.

. . .

We want to go back to a time when men needed women and women needed men. By this, I mean a time when the question wasn’t whether men wanted women or women wanted men, but rather their mutual necessity. Wanting is a frivolous act that comes and goes with the wind. (Exhibit X: suddenly Tatum O’Neal has abandoned men and become Rosie O’Donnell’s troubled brood’s next notorious stepmom.) Needing is an innate human inclination that bestows dignity on another person. If someone wants me, I am an object. If someone needs me, I am dignified; I hold something irreplaceable.

Women hate it when they aren’t needed. Men hate it, too. Perhaps we are learning now, the hard way, that they need their sexes to be needed in addition to their individual personalities. The irreplaceability of our gender turns out to be something that humans cannot surrender lightly. Hence, people are rebelling.

. . .

Swift isn’t the first sexy pop diva to break open a bottle of mid-century nostalgia on us. Remember Fergie’s homage to the Prohibition era in “Glamorous,” Katy Perry’s “Roar,” and Christina Aguilera’s hailing of the Veronica Lake aesthetic in “Candyman”? But there’s something different this time. Fergie interspersed her gangster footage with images of post-Cold War urban partying. Perry shows no interest in “Roar” in falling in love with a man, choosing rather to stuff her bust into a jungle bikini top and act weird. Aguilera in “Candyman” dances and gyrates for crowds of uniformed servicemen, but doesn’t connect with any one.

All three of these backward glances were narcissistic exercises of consumption, designed to feed the modern egos of hyper-sexualized women. None of them shows, as Swift’s video does, a sincere desire to embody a lost world of femininity and masculinity.

Expect more of Swift’s kind of nostalgia. The world hungers for it.