NOM BLOG

The Decision on Marriage Should Not Be Rushed

 

"Expanding the definition of marriage away from the way cultures and civilization have always defined it can only lead to further confusion.” - Rev. Russell Moore

As the world readies for the Supreme Court’s decision on same-sex marriage, defenders of marriage are urging the justices to take into account all the known effects that redefining marriage would bring upon our nation.

Proponents of same-sex marriage are arguing that now is the time for marriage to be redefined, because the “popular opinion” promulgated by the media is that marriage should be redefined. In contrast, marriage champions are asking the Supreme Court to look at the facts, look at what is actually written in the constitution, and look at what is best for the children.

While the media may very well be against us, NOM will never give up fighting for marriage, for freedom, and for truth.

ThinkstockPhotos-494897031The idea that same-sex marriage might have uncertain effects on children is strongly contested by those who want the court to declare that same-sex couples have a right to marry in all 50 states. Among the 31 plaintiffs in the cases that will be argued at the court on April 28 are parents who have spent years seeking formal recognition on their children's birth certificates or adoption papers.

But opponents, in dozens of briefs asking the court to uphold state bans on same-sex marriage, insist they are not motivated by any prejudice toward gays and lesbians.

"This is an issue on which people of good will may reasonably disagree," lawyer John Bursch wrote in his defense of Michigan's gay-marriage ban. Bursch argued on behalf of the states that same-sex couples can claim no constitutional right to marriage.

. . .

The concern for children is among several threads that run through the legal, political, social and religious arguments being advanced in support of upholding the same-sex marriage bans.

"If children don't do as well when they are raised by same-sex parents, why would we want to establish or encourage that as a social norm?" asked the Rev. D. Paul Sullins, a Catholic University sociology professor. Sullins has analyzed data in government surveys and concluded that children brought up by two parents of the same sex have a higher rate of emotional problems than their peers raised by heterosexual parents.

Sullins has been harshly criticized by sociologists who support same-sex marriage, but he said he stands by his data. "I don't know of any Catholic way to compute the equation," he said. "The idea that there are no differences is emphatically mistaken. I don't know how else to say that."

For the full article, please visit 12NewsNow.