NOM BLOG

The Christians Who Stand Strong on Marriage

 

Media outlets always seem to pick up on the rare occurrences of faithful evangelicals abandoning biblical principles by supporting same-sex marriage. It is precisely because such events are few and far between that they generate high levels of interest in the news world.

ThinkstockPhotos-154225516In contrast, it is a refreshing and welcomed change to see Christianity Today explain that Christians across the globe will continue to support marriage as between one man and one woman, because the theology of marriage is powerful and true:

[I]t’s not at all certain that the rapid cultural shift in America on gay marriage will be mirrored in the Christian church. North American and European Christians who believe in gay marriage are a small minority in these regions, and churches that ascribe to a more liberal sexual ethic continue to wither. Meanwhile, poll Christians in Africa, Asia, and practically anywhere in the world, and you’ll hear a resounding “no” to gay marriage. Scan the history of the church for 2,000 years and you’ll have a hard time turning up any Christian who would support same-sex marriage. The church has been and remains overwhelmingly united. It’s undergoing stress, certainly. But the evidence doesn’t support a narrative of division and collapse on this point.

The reasons for this are many, but one that most commentators and same-sex marriage advocates fail to recognize is the profound theology that undergirds our ethics. That theology has been either assumed or articulated by the great theologians and Christian philosophers in the Protestant, Orthodox, and Catholic traditions—the most sophisticated recent effort being John Paul II's work on the theology of the body. (See our pages on homosexuality and same-sex marriage for more on what CT has said over the years.) It is not driven by an irrational prejudice of people living in the past, as the American zeitgeist assumes. It’s a consistent, nuanced, and, we believe, biblical working out of a theology of sexuality.

The unity and depth of Christian teaching on marriage may not be news. Neither are the hundreds of thousands of planes that land safely each day. It’s not novel. It’s not surprising or counterintuitive. But it is reality—and a reality that is not going away anytime soon. Any time at all, for that matter, because it is grounded in the deepest realities.

Full article is available via Christianity Today.