NOM BLOG

Political Leaders Defending Religious Liberty

 

“There is no constitutional right or rationale basis to support a decision forcing states to recognize same-sex relationships as marriages more than any other relationship. The only way the court can arrive at such a decision is by creating special rights for same-sex relationships on par with civil rights that were granted to African Americans in the ‘60s. This will necessarily preclude everyone, including religious institutions, from upholding their beliefs about marriage on their private property.” -Daniel Horowitz

ThinkstockPhotos-122402348Conservative Review’s Senior Editor, Daniel Horowitz, comments on the recent actions of Texas Senator Ted Cruz and Utah Senator Mike Lee to protect religious liberties, and calls on other political leaders to follow suit:

In comes Sen. Mike Lee (R-UT) with a bill to protect religious institutions from any discrimination or reprisal from the federal government in the event that a new constitutional right is invented. In the coming days, he plans to reintroduce his Marriage and Religious Liberty Act from last year with some additions. In addition to protecting religious institutions from “adverse action,” this bill prevents the federal government from denying tax-exempt status to charitable groups, invalidating employee benefit plans that fail to accommodate same-sex relationships, or discriminate against them in any contractual relationship with the government.

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) has already introduced legislation to mitigate the damage of an impending ‘Roe v Wade-style’ ruling in the marriage case. The Protect Marriage from the Courts Act of 2015 would freeze any action implementing the court’s decision by stripping the federal courts from any jurisdiction over marriage. It also invokes Congress’ power to make exceptions to the appellate jurisdiction of the Supreme Court by making it clear that the judgment only applies to the parties in the current case and cannot be applied to other cases. This will allow states like Alabama to invoke their plenary power over marriage and withhold licenses for same-sex couples – without the federal courts attempting to use this case as precedent for invalidating further state actions.

. . .

In the event that the Supreme Court strikes down marriage as an institution in the coming weeks, there will be a stampede for the doors in Republican circles to wash their hands of defending marriage and religious liberty once and for all. Cruz and Lee are making it clear that the fight is just beginning. Where is Sen. Mitch McConnell? Will he join with them to bring these bills to the floor instead of focusing on growing government or rubber stamping Obama’s agenda? Will all the presidential candidates promise to continue the fight even after the Supreme Court’s decision and sign these bills into law?

This nation was originally founded as a haven for religious liberty. It was not founded for the purpose of universal health care subsidies. Shouldn’t Republicans exhibit the same zeal to protect marriage and religious liberty from the courts as they plan to do with Obamacare subsidies?

Original article is available at Conservative Review.