NOM BLOG

Heal With Compassion, Not with Surgery

 

People opposed to the transgender movement are often accused of being bigots. In truth, I—like many others—harbor no hate for people who suffer from gender identity disorder. Rather, I feel deep compassion and concern for them in their suffering. As someone in the field of psychology, I hope we can one day find a more holistic, less invasive means to treat this disorder. - Nuriddeen Knight

ThinkstockPhotos-56179023In a recent article from Public Discourse, Columbia University’s Teachers College alumna Nuriddeen Knight, an African American, explains how her family encouraged her to be proud of her heritage, while she herself experienced insecurities. At difficult times, she admits that she slipped into the mindset that certain skin tones, body types, and hair styles were “better.” Nonetheless, she overcame these insecurities, and now reflects on how her experiences have helped her understand what the transgender movement really is advocating: self-harm to those who follow its ideals.

If I had gone to my parents begging them to be white, I think they might have laughed, cried, comforted me, and worried what they did wrong as parents. But what if I had told them not only that I wanted to be white but that I actually was white? What if I had declared that the race of my body simply didn’t match that of my mind? I think they would’ve been deeply troubled.

. . .

ThinkstockPhotos-76222524But what if, instead of wanting to be white, I wanted to be a man? What if, instead of crying to my parents that I was really a white person, I told them that I was really a man and that I desperately wanted to change my body to match my mind? If, in this scenario, you think that my parents should applaud my courage, accept my new gender identity, and run to the nearest surgeon, please ask yourself: “Why?”

There’s no doubt that race and sex are two very different issues. Race is a social construct invented during the era of slavery. Before the European enslavement of Africans, there were no united “black people” in Africa, and there were no united “white people” in Europe. Thanks to slavery, the labels of black and white became a convenient way to continue oppression, but they are a relatively new way of identifying one’s self.

But sex is not a human invention. Yes, gender roles are culturally created. Still, that does not erase the fact that every human being (except intersex individuals, who represent a tiny percentage) is born with a distinctive set of physical and biological attributes that constitute them as male or female. That is a truth that cannot be erased with time.

Please read Knight’s full article at The Public Discourse.